Updated Mar 2, 2015

Since its founding, college squash has had many milestones. Below is a brief summary of notable events:

  • 1931: The Intercollegiate Squash Racquets Association, later known as the National Intercollegiate Squash Racquets Association (NISRA), is founded.  This association eventually becomes the Men’s College Squash Association.
  • 1932: The first men’s intercollegiate singles tournament is held. Beekman Pool (Harvard University) wins the tournament. His father, Eugene, donates the Pool Trophy.
  • 1942: By winning the regular season, Princeton University captures the first men’s national team title.
  • 1956: Men’s intercollegiate squash adds a team component to its individual tournament, establishing  the Four-Man Trophy.
  • 1957: The United States Naval Academy becomes the first non-Ivy League school to capture the men’s team title.
  • 1965: The first women’s intercollegiate singles championship is held at Wellesley College. Katherine Allabough of Vassar wins the inaugural event.
  • 1969: Men’s intercollegiate squash expands the Four-Man Trophy competition to include six players, and thus becomes known as the Six-Man Trophy.
  • 1970: Princeton University coach Betty Howe Constable, Vassar coach Betty Richey, and University of Pennsylvania coach Ann Wetzel organize the United States Women’s Intercollegiate Squash Racquets Association (USWISRA), later known as the Women’s Intercollegiate Squash Association (WISA). The Association eventually becomes the Women’s College Squash Association.
  • 1973: Princeton University wins the inaugural women’s national intercollegiate team tournament (Howe Cup).
  • 1980: Gail Ramsay, a Pennsylvania State University student, wins her fourth consecutive intercollegiate singles title.  She is the first college player, man or woman, to win four singles titles.
  • 1989: Men’s college squash establishes a team tournament to decide the national title. The Potter Cup (A Draw, teams 1 – 8 playing for the national championship), Hoehn Cup (B Draw, teams ranked 9 – 16), Summers Cup (C Draw, teams ranked 17 – 24), and Conroy Cup (D Draw, teams ranked 25 – 32) are established.  The cups are named for longtime coaches in the men’s game: Art Potter, the United States Naval Academy’s coach; Edward “Red” Hoehn, the  Dartmouth coach; Jack Summers, the MIT coach; and John Conroy, who coached at Princeton.
  • 1993: Men’s college squash adds a fifth division (teams ranked 33 – 40) to its team tournament: the Chaffee Cup. The Cup is named after Clarence C. Chaffee, the longtime Williams coach.
  • 1993: Women’s squash changes from the hardball to the softball.
  • 1994: Men’s squash changes from the hardball to the softball.
  • 1994: Women’s squash changes its  scoring methods from point-a-rally to 15 to nine-point international scoring. In addition, they add referees for their dual matches.
  • 1996: Men add referees for their dual matches.
  • 1998: Women’s college squash adds B, C, and D draws to its national team tournament.
  • 2001: Men’s college squash changes its scoring methods from point-a-rally to 15 to nine-point international scoring.
  • 2002: The National Intercollegiate Squash Racquets Association (NISRA) and the Women’s Intercollegiate Squash Association partner to form the College Squash Association. Men’s and Women’s college squash continue to operate independent of one another.
  • 2002: Women’s college squash renames the B, C, and D draws of its national team tournament after pioneering women’s coaches: Aggie Bixler Kurtz (coached at Dartmouth), Dale Walker (coached at Yale), and Patty Epps (coached at Franklin & Marshall). The tournament now consists of four draws: the Howe Cup (A Draw, teams ranked 1 – 8 playing for the national championship); the Kurtz Cup (B Draw, teams ranked 9 – 16); the Walker Cup (C Draw, teams ranked 17 – 24); and the Epps Cup (D Draw, teams ranked 25 – 32).
  • 2002: Trinity College becomes the first non-Ivy League school to capture the women’s team championship.
  • 2003: The men establish a second draw at the individual tournament. It is named in honor of Albert Molloy, Jr., the longtime coach of UPenn.
  • 2003: The women split the 64-person individual singles championship into two draws: A Draw (players seeded 1-32) and B Draw (players seeded 33-64). The A Draw is named in honor of Gail Ramsay, who played at Pennsylvania State University, and the B Draw is named for Demer Holleran, who played at Princeton University.
  • 2006: Yasser El-Halaby (Princeton University) becomes the first men’s player to win four consecutive intercollegiate singles titles.
  • 2008: Men’s college squash adds a sixth division to its team tournament, the Serues Cup. Edward Serues was the coach at Amherst College.
  • 2009: Men’s college squash adds a seventh division (teams ranked 49 – 56) to its team tournament, the Hawthorn Cup. Bob Hawthorn was Fordham’s squash coach.
  • 2009: Men’s and Women’s college squash adopts Point-A-Rally scoring to 11 points.
  • 2010: Women’s college squash adds a fifth division (teams ranked 33 – 40) to its team tournament, the E Division.
  • 2012: Trinity’s 252 match winning streak, the longest winning streak in the history of varsity intercollegiate sports in the United States, ends.
  • 2015: Men’s college squash adds a eighth division (teams ranked 57 – 63) to its team championship, the H Division.
  • 2015: Women’s college squash adds a sixth division (teams ranked 41 – 48) to its team tournament, the F Division.
  • 2015: For the first time ever, the Potter Cup (men’s national team championship) is contested between two non-Ivy League Schools, Trinity College and St. Lawrence University. In addition, it marked the first time two schools association with the NCAA’s Division III met to determine the title.
  • 2015: Amanda Sobhy (Harvard University) becomes the second women’s player to win four consecutive intercollegiate singles titles.